Wednesday, March 04, 2015

We Raised the Dough!

Last week, Campus Kitchens across the country competed against one another to see who could raise the most money to support their hunger-fighting work. They galvanized hundreds of student, congregation, and community supporters – 943, to be exact – with impressive results. Together, they raised $56,293 to support their innovative student-powered hunger relief efforts.


The Campus Kitchen at Washington, DC (CKWDC) raised $12,715, thereby winning an additional $1,000 prize for raising the most “dough” of any Campus Kitchen. CKWDC will use the funds they raised to support their food recovery and meal production efforts – we plan to create 15,000 healthy, balanced meals for Washington, DC residents this year alone. Further, the Campus Kitchen is aiming to expand their services to an under-served community east of the Anacostia River to provide fresh produce and healthful meals in an area considered a food desert. Thank you to all who support us!

The Campus Kitchen at Gettysburg College came in second place, raising $10,537 and winning an additional $500 grant. Students with the Campus Kitchen at Saint Peter’s University raised $6,000 to come in third, winning an additional $250. Finally, a $750 prize was also given to the Campus Kitchen at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore/Shady Grove (who raised $5,020) for engaging 159 donors – the most of any competitor.

A giant “thank you” goes out to all of our  donors and to all who shared our challenge with their own networks. Your support makes all the difference in powering our lean and sustainable solutions to hunger. Thank you for investing in our work!

- Rev. Dottie Yunger

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Dona Collary, 20 Years at Metropolitan

 Dona Collary, 20 Years at Metropolitan
By Barry D. Wood
Like only a few others, Dona Collary is the institutional memory of Metropolitan Memorial. Hired 20 years ago as a bookkeeper, Dona has toiled under five senior pastors from Bill Holmes to Charlie Parker. Over the years she has been the finance chief, director of administration and is now working as the pastoral care assistant. In addition to this position she is also in charge of weddings and funerals and works closely on all elements of those events.

Dona is self-proclaimed “old school,” with a formidable work ethic and fervent loyalty. There are few tasks she’s unwilling to take on. She was intimately involved in both the $6 million capital campaign that among other things installed the steeple and completed the stonework on the east façade. Earlier she oversaw the $5 million campaign that built the new wing that houses church offices and the gathering space above.

Dona grew up in small town Amsbry in central Pennsylvania, where her 95-year-old mother still lives. She’s been married to Don, a retired accountant, for 52-years. Her daughter recently moved from Beltsville, where Dona lives, to Annapolis and her son Scott is a banker who just took a position in financial services in Melbourne, Australia. Dona has four grandchildren and a “great-grand dog,” Boots.

For most of her working life Dona held two jobs. She was in multiple positions during a 20-year career at Sears in the White Oak Mall in Silver Spring. Beginning in hosiery and handbags, she advanced to personnel, credit and finally customer services where she supervised a staff of 30. Dona becomes misty-eyed when talking about the demise of a once great company.

While Dona was at Sears she worked 12 years at a second job at a property management firm in Silver Spring. She came to Metropolitan in February 1995 and continued part time at Sears for several years.

Many things have changed over these 20 years and one of them is that a commute to Beltsville that used to take as little as 20-minutes now takes an hour. Join us in honoring Dona Collary and her 20 years of service on Sunday, February 22 at 10:10am in the Vestry and during the 9am and 11:15am Worship Services at Metropolitan Memorial.

Monday, February 23, 2015

Campus Kitchen "Raise the Dough Challenge"




The Campus Kitchen at Washington DC is a non-profit that empowers young leaders to create change in their community, while addressing hunger. We recover around 4,500 lbs of high quality produce and protein from commercial food operators, food that would otherwise go to waste. With our chef and volunteers from colleges, our church community, and the surrounding community, we make and deliver around 1,300 meals every month. 
In the 2013-2014 academic year alone, 429 volunteers dedicated 2,359 volunteer hours to recover 51,402 pounds of food and prepare 3,279 nutritious meals for the DC community. We delivered to 7 community partner organizations, which serves 253 clients, adding $43,405 in economic value from meals and extra food provided. Our meals go to at risk youth, many of whom are on free or reduced lunch, at risk seniors, trying to age in place and avoid isolation, and the homeless, who don’t know where their next meal will come from.
From February 20-27, CKWDC is competing against other Campus Kitchens across the country in the Raise the Dough Challenge to raise money and awareness for our program. The Campus Kitchen that raises the most money will receive a cash prize to go toward their efforts. That funding would mean we are able to build long-term solutions to hunger and food waste, so we’re reaching out to YOU to help us win!
Our kitchen is located in our St. Luke's Mission Center, which serves the community through various programs of care and compassion, engaging neighbors, students, community leaders, and church members in its mission of extending radical hospitality, transforming lives, and pursuing justice.
Rev. Dottie Yunger


Thursday, February 19, 2015

Dona Collary, 20 Years at Metropolitan

 By Barry D. Wood
Like only a few others, Dona Collary is the institutional memory of Metropolitan Memorial. Hired 20 years ago as a bookkeeper, Dona has toiled under five senior pastors from Bill Holmes to Charlie Parker. Over the years she has been the finance chief, director of administration and is now working as the pastoral care assistant. In addition to this position she is also in charge of weddings and funerals and works closely on all elements of those events.

Dona is self-proclaimed “old school,” with a formidable work ethic and fervent loyalty. There are few tasks she’s unwilling to take on. She was intimately involved in both the $6 million capital campaign that among other things installed the steeple and completed the stonework on the east façade. Earlier she oversaw the $5 million campaign that built the new wing that houses church offices and the gathering space above.
Dona grew up in small town Amsbry in central Pennsylvania, where her 95-year-old mother still lives. She’s been married to Don, a retired accountant, for 52-years. Her daughter recently moved from Beltsville, where Dona lives, to Annapolis and her son Scott is a banker who just took a position in financial services in Melbourne, Australia. Dona has four grandchildren and a “great-grand dog,” Boots.

For most of her working life Dona held two jobs. She was in multiple positions during a 20-year career at Sears in the White Oak Mall in Silver Spring. Beginning in hosiery and handbags, she advanced to personnel, credit and finally customer services where she supervised a staff of 30. Dona becomes misty-eyed when talking about the demise of a once great company.
While Dona was at Sears she worked 12 years at a second job at a property management firm in Silver Spring. She came to Metropolitan in February 1995 and continued part time at Sears for several years.

Many things have changed over these 20 years and one of them is that a commute to Beltsville that used to take as little as 20-minutes now takes an hour. Join us in honoring Dona Collary and her 20 years of service on Sunday, February 22 at 10:10am in the Vestry and during the 9am and 11:15am Worship Services at Metropolitan Memorial.

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

Lent and Ash Wednesday




Lent is a special time in the church year.  In the 40 days before Easter (46 if you count Sundays), Christians traditionally spend time fasting, praying, and seeking to draw closer to God.  Some people give up particular foods or distractions for Lent.  Other people take on a new habit or discipline for Lent, such as daily Bible reading, service projects, keeping a gratitude journal, or praying more.   I tell children that Lent is the time when we get very quiet so that we can listen very closely to God.
The last day before Lent is called Shrove Tuesday. “Shrove” comes from a word that means “to confess,” because it’s the day before we confess all our sins and start Lent.  It’s also called Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday) because it was traditionally the day people would use up all their rich foods and oil before starting the Lenten fast.  The tradition of eating pancakes on Shrove Tuesday came about because pancakes contain rich ingredients like eggs, milk, and butter that would have to be used up before Ash Wednesday. You can celebrate this tradition by coming to the Shrove Tuesday pancake dinner on Tuesday, February 17, 6-8 pm, in the Metropolitan Memorial Vestry. There will be pancakes, bacon, eggs, arts & crafts, and fun for all ages. 

Lent begins on Ash Wednesday (February 18 this year).  Traditionally, Christians are marked with a smudge of ashes on the forehead or hand – sometimes the smudge is in the shape of a cross.  Ashes are an ancient sign of mourning and repentance.  The idea behind Ash Wednesday is that we wear the ash mark to show we are sorry for the wrongs we have done, and to remind us to turn toward God.  The ashes are a sign of our commitment to spend the 40 days of Lent turning toward God, so we can fully experience the joy of Easter.

We have several opportunities to participate in the ritual of ashes at Metropolitan.  There will be worship services at 7:30am and 7:30pm at Metropolitan Memorial, and at noon at Wesley UMC.  You do not have to be Methodist, you do not have to attend Metropolitan church, you do not even have to be Christian; you just have to want to turn toward God.  Pastors Kate Payton and Dottie Yunger will be out in the community, offering the imposition of ashes to our neighbors. In addition, Ash Wednesday morning, February 18, I will be in the lobby behind the welcome desk during the nursery school drop-off time (8:45am - 9:15am) for a child-friendly adaptation of the ritual of ashes for kids and parents.

Wishing you a meaningful Lent,
Rev. Janet

Bring in Your Books!



There is no such thing as too many books. However, there is such a thing as not enough room.

Are you plagued with too many books in your home? Are they spilling out of your nightstand or stacked in a corner? The United Methodist Women would like to help you. March 14, we'll be holding a book and bake sale in the Vestry. We're selling used books that booklovers have kindly donated to us.  All the proceeds from the sale will benefit UMW-supported programs from women and children locally and globally.

Let us help you pare down your collection and spread the joy of reading to others. Here are five  some places to look for books in your home that you no longer need:


  • Bring a fresh eye to your bookshelves. You may not intend to read some of the books you have there taking up valuable shelf space.
  • Look over your cookbook collection for some compendiums that you haven't cracked in years.
  • Do you store books in your closets, basement, or garage because your bookshelves are overflowing? Now may be a good time to do some spring cleaning.
  • Maybe you have some children's books that your kids have outgrown. Or maybe, all of your kids books were sent to the attic when your kids moved out of your house. Now is the time to unearth them and bring them in.
  • Don't forget to look in your music collection as the UMW would be happy to take your donations of CDs, vinyl records, and DVDs.

But remember, what the UMW cannot sell are travel books published before 2010, textbooks, and magazines, so please just recycle those.

All donations can be dropped off at the UMW closet at the end of the hallway leading off the Vestry (near the parlor) from now until March 13. And make sure to join us March 14 in the Vestry between 8 am and 3 pm to fill up your home with more books!  

Volunteer to help by contacting Anita Seline or Martha Mizroch or click here.

                                                                                                            ---Anita Seline

Friday, February 13, 2015

Experience a Transformational Lent

Ash Wednesday begins the season of Lent. The biblical witness is found in the opening epic of the human story: "you are dust and to dust you shall return" (Gen 3:19). In the 10th century the use of ashes was employed in visibly reminding worshipers of their mortality as they began their Lenten "watch by the cross."

On February 18, the first day of Lent reminds us that two things are involved in genuine repentance: the dying of the old self and the coming to life of the new. The way to Easter is the way of the cross. "Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death?" (Romans 6:3). New life with Christ involves a daily surrendering of the old life. The first step of this Lenten journey invites us to acknowledge our mortality and our sinfulness by the imposition of ashes. A contemplative style worship with music, prayer, meditation and silence followed by the imposition of ashes and celebration of communion, will be offered at Metropolitan Memorial at 7:30am and 7:30pm, and at Wesley (5312 Conn. Ave. NW) at noon.

Get Your Ash Out of Church...
Last year, Pastors Kate Payton and Dottie Yunger began a new tradition of “Get Your Ash Out of Church” making themselves available for the imposition of ashes at the Tenley Metro Stop and the Starbucks near our St. Luke’s Mission Center. This year, they will be spreading the net wider and need some volunteers to help. If you would like to participate contact Rev. Kate Payton, kpayton@nationalchurch.org or 202-363-4900, ext. 110 or Rev. Dottie Yunger, dyunger@nationalchurch.org or 202-363-4900, ext. 111.

Transforming Fear - Sunday Evening Contemplative Worship
February 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29
Our Sunday evening Lenten Contemplative service offers a time of quiet prayer and reflection, song and meditation and silence. Let the sounds of the organ, flute and cello wash over you as you sit in quiet contemplation. Center yourself with the music of Taize and sit or walk in silence as you reflect on the word. Then enter back into community with communion and blessing before returning back into the world.

Lenten Sermon Series: Who Is Jesus?
During Lent at Metropolitan, Rev. Dr. Charles Parker will lead us on an exploration of who we understand Jesus to be. Through the use of the lectionary readings, each week will highlight a particular aspect of our understanding of Jesus: Son of God, Son of Man, Prophet of the Most High, Redeemer, Priest and Sacrifice, Suffering Servant and on Easter Sunday, the Risen One. 

- Patrisha House

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Ministries for Life Transitions

Ministries for Life Transitions completed its highly successful series of programs at the January “Food for Thought” sessions, including two weeks with renowned spiritual leader Marjory Bankson. We learned in detail of the cycle which defines times of transition.

Paradoxically, transitions begin with an ending, a coming to a close which can be joyous (graduation, promotion), but is likely to involve pain. They then move through a “neutral zone,” a time when the old is over and the new has not yet begun. This can be a time of deliberate separateness or a time of chaos or fallowness. Only as the neutral zone ends can the new beginning take root.

Moving forward, Ministries for Life Transitions plans to hold an educational event on Sundays at 12:30 after the second service each month until the summer break. The February event will be February 15. Lois Copeland, a leader of The Compassionate Friends will speak about bereaved families and the people who care about them following the death of a child, sibling or grandchild. A light lunch will be served. To sign up for lunch, please contact Barbara Green.

Four transition groups have emerged for the next stage of this ministry.
  • Careers
  • Creative Aging
  • Chronic Illness and Caregiving
  • End of Life and Bereavement
Anyone is invited to join any of these groups, whether or not you attended the January sessions.